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Archive for the 'World Civ-Nationalism in Europe' Category

German Nationalism Lecture Notes

Tuesday, November 3rd, 2015

My Lecture Outline

  • Neither holy, nor Roman, nor an Empire: “300 Germanies”
  • Impact of the Congress of Vienna on Germany and Prussia
  • “Siamese Twins”: Zollverien and Railroads
  • Struggles for Nationalism, Liberalism and Democracy in Vormaerz:
    • Wartburg Festival (1817)
    • Carlsbad Decrees (1819)
    • Hambach Festival (1832)
    • Gottingen Seven (1837)
  • The Spirit of ‘48
  • Frankfurt Parliament
  • Constitution of St. Paul’s Church
  • Erfurt Union & Punctuation/Humiliation of Olmutz
    • Germany: Born of War?
    • Von Roon, von Moltke, and the Prussian military machine
    • Schleswig-Holstein Wars (1848-52, 1864)
    • Austro-Prussian War (1866)
    • Franco-Prussian War (1870-71)
  • Proclamation of German Empire (18 January 1871)
  • More Than Iron & Blood: Karl Baedeker, Brothers Grimm, von Fallersleben, and von Humboldt

Here is my Power Point on the road to German unity.  Enjoy!

German Caricatures of Napoleon’s Army “In Shambles”

Tuesday, May 14th, 2013

While Napoleon Bonaparte waged war across the continent in the early 19th century, European satirists living in countries threatened by his encroachments represented his progress in a flood of caricatures.

These prints, published in French-occupied Germany in 1813, depict a parade of ragged French soldiers. Some are mounted on sorry-looking horses, some are missing limbs, and most lack shoes and lean heavily on canes. Any semblance of military uniformity has dropped away, as the men appear swathed in rags and tatters.

After Napoleon’s ill-fated attempt to wage war on Russia in the summer of 1812, his army of half a million men suffered greatly—first from the heat, as the Russians withdrew inland and dragged the invading army along, and later from the winter snow and cold, as they retreated, pursued by the Russian forces. As Joe Knight wrote for Slate last year, the army was also plagued by lice, and large numbers of men died of typhus carried by the insects.

German History in Documents and Images

Wednesday, January 2nd, 2013

German History in Documents and Images (GHDI) is a comprehensive collection of original historical materials documenting German history from the beginning of the early modern period to the present. The project comprises ten sections, each of which addresses a discrete period in Germany’s history.

GDHI is a great resource for German History 1500-Present

STW: Germany and the EU

Tuesday, January 1st, 2013

On Start the Week Andrew Marr looks at Germany’s role in Europe. Katinka Barysch argues that despite the crisis, support for EU integration still dominates, and that unlike Britain, the ability to compromise is seen as a skill, not a weakness. Two British MPs, from left and right, Gisela Stuart and Douglas Carswell, remain sceptical about the EU, but German-born Stuart understands her birth country’s emotional connection to it. Carswell argues that the digital revolution calls for smaller, not larger governments, and Karen Leeder believes that despite Germany’s belief in the European project it still has not laid to rest the ghosts of unification.

Political Borders of Germany from 1789 to 2005

Tuesday, January 1st, 2013

2 minute YouTube clip summarizing the Political Borders of Germany from 1789 to 2005

Modern History Sourcebook: Documents of German Unification, 1848-1871

Wednesday, November 21st, 2012

 

In Our Time Podcast: Clausewitz and On War

Wednesday, November 21st, 2012

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss On War, a treatise on the theory and practice of warfare written by the Prussian soldier and intellectual Carl von Clausewitz. First published in 1832, Clausewitz’s magnum opus is commonly regarded as the most important book about military theory ever written. Informed by its author’s experience of fighting against the mighty armies of Napoleon, the work looks not just at the practicalities of warfare, but offers a subtle philosophical analysis of the nature of war and its relationship with politics. Notions such as the Clausewitzian Trinity have had an enormous effect on later military leaders. But its influence is felt today not just on the battlefield but also in politics and business.

LSE Lecture – From Kaiser Wilhelm to Chancellor Merkel. The German Question on the European Stage

Wednesday, November 21st, 2012

Speaker: Professor Andreas Rödder

Recorded on 7 November 2012 in New Theatre, East Building.

The German Question has kept Europe in suspense for more than a century. It appeared to have eventually been solved by German unification and through the integration of the D-Mark – the German “atomic bomb” – into the European Monetary Union. However, after losing two world wars and a third of its territory, having committed the holocaust and expelled huge numbers of its elites, after Europeanising central elements of its power and yet being strained by the economical impact of reunification, Germany is once more suspected of aspiring to supremacy. The lecture will follow the twisted story of Germany in Europe since the late 19th century. In particular it will analyse the connection between German reunification and the decision to introduce the Euro in order to highlight the current “German question” from a historical perspective.

Andreas Rödder holds the chair for Contemporary History at the Johannes Gutenberg-University in Mainz (Germany). He has published books on the mid 19th-century English Conservatives, in German foreign politics in the interwar period as well as on Germany in the 1970s and 80s and at last on German reunification.

Opinion Poll, Berliner Illustrierte Zeitung, 1899

Sunday, November 11th, 2012
  1. Who is the greatest statesman of the century?
  2. Who is the greatest military commander of the century?
  3. Whom would you name the greatest hero of the century?
  4. Who was the most significant woman of the century?
  5. Who is the greatest inventor…?
  6. Which is the most useful invention/discovery?
  7. The greatest historical event…?
  8. The most important battle?
  9. The greatest deed of civilization?
  10. What was the happiest period of time in this century?
  11. The unhappiest period?
  12. Who were the two greatest Berliners?

Responses:

1. Bismarck (Baron vom Stein got a few dozen votes; Gladstone mentioned)
2. Napoleon (3300 votes); Moltke (3000); “alcoholism” because it conquers all generals.
3. Wilhelm I (2400); Bismarck (1600): Stanley, Garibaldi mentioned; Dr. Mueller of Vienna nominated himself.
4. Queen Luise of Prussia (2100); Queen Victoria (800); George Sand
5. Edison; Stephenson, Morse, Fulton, Howe distant runners-up
6. The railroad; also mentioned electric power, steamship, telegraph, x-ray
7. German unification (some say defeat of Napoleon; a few, the Revolution of 1848)
8. Battle of Leipzig (4300); Sedan (2000)
9. Slave emancipation (a close second, colonialism); social legislation of the Reich; Suez Canal
10. The majority, 1871-1900; a close second, 1871-1880
11. 1806-1812; a few, 1815-1848; 1867-73; 1848, 1878-1890
12. Alexander von Humboldt (1500); Wilhelm I (1200); Wilhelm II mentioned.

From Kaiser Wilhelm to Chancellor Merkel. The German Question on the European Stage

Sunday, November 11th, 2012

Recorded at LSE on 7 November 2012.

The German Question has kept Europe in suspense for more than a century. It appeared to have eventually been solved by German unification and through the integration of the D-Mark – the German “atomic bomb” – into the European Monetary Union. However, after losing two world wars and a third of its territory, having committed the holocaust and expelled huge numbers of its elites, after Europeanising central elements of its power and yet being strained by the economical impact of reunification, Germany is once more suspected of aspiring to supremacy. The lecture will follow the twisted story of Germany in Europe since the late 19th century. In particular it will analyse the connection between German reunification and the decision to introduce the Euro in order to highlight the current “German question” from a historical perspective.

Andreas Rödder holds the chair for Contemporary History at the Johannes Gutenberg-University in Mainz (Germany).

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