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Archive for the 'USH: Vietnam War' Category

The Vietnam War, as Seen by the Victor

Wednesday, August 5th, 2015

The event, known in the United States as the fall of Saigon and conjuring images of panicked Vietnamese trying to crowd onto helicopters to be evacuated, is celebrated as Reunification Day here in Hanoi. The holiday involves little explicit reflection on the country’s 15-year-plus conflict, in which North Vietnam and its supporters in the South fought to unify the country under communism, and the U.S. intervened on behalf of South Vietnam’s anti-communist government. More than 58,000 American soldiers died in the fighting between 1960 and 1975; the estimated number of Vietnamese soldiers and civilians killed on both sides varies widely, from 2.1 million to 3.8 million during the American intervention and in related conflicts before and after.

Vietnam War as Seen by the Victors

Vietnam war photo essay from the Atlantic

Sunday, April 5th, 2015

check out this three-part series. Harrowing. Mind bending. 

The Vietnamese tribesmen who fought alongside American Special Forces

Saturday, January 4th, 2014

The indigenous Montagnards, recruited into service by the American Special Forces in Vietnam’s mountain highlands, defended villages against the Viet Cong and served as rapid response forces. The Special Forces and the Montagnards—each tough, versatile, and accustomed to living in wild conditions—formed an affinity for each other. In the testimony of many veterans, their working relationship with the Montagnards, nicknamed Yards, was a bright spot in a confusing and frustrating war.

The bond between America’s elite fighters and their indigenous partners has persisted into the present, but despite the best efforts of vets, the Montagnards have suffered greatly in the postwar years, at least in part because they cast their lot with the U.S. Army. In a war with more than its share of tragedies, this one is less often told but is crucial to understanding the conflict and its toll.

Vietnam: The Photo

Sunday, April 7th, 2013

Eddie Adams (1933-2004) who documented thirteen wars, shot one of the most iconic, memorable and gritty images of the Vietnam War on February 1, 1968 which you see above.  This image is forever etched into the minds and history books of both past and future generations.

0120110417-EddieAdams

 

Johnson tapes: Richard Nixon’s ‘treason

Sunday, April 7th, 2013

Declassified tapes of President Lyndon Johnson’s telephone calls provide a fresh insight into his world. Among the revelations – he planned a dramatic entry into the 1968 Democratic Convention to re-join the presidential race. And he caught Richard Nixon sabotaging the Vietnam peace talks… but said nothing.

“…It begins in the summer of 1968. Nixon feared a breakthrough at the Paris Peace talks designed to find a negotiated settlement to the Vietnam war, and he knew this would derail his campaign.

He therefore set up a clandestine back-channel involving Anna Chennault, a senior campaign adviser.

Chennault was despatched to the South Vietnamese embassy with a clear message: the South Vietnamese government should withdraw from the talks, refuse to deal with Johnson, and if Nixon was elected, they would get a much better deal.

So on the eve of his planned announcement of a halt to the bombing, Johnson learned the South Vietnamese were pulling out….”

Party politics at it’s finest, my friends!

Vietnam, Iraq & Public Opinion

Sunday, April 7th, 2013

Looking back, do you think the United States made a mistake sending troops to fight in ... ? Iraq, Afghanistan, Vietnam (March 2013 results by party ID)

Looking back, do you think the United States made a mistake sending troops to fight in ... ? Iraq, Afghanistan, Vietnam (March 2013 results by age)

Examine the survey methods here

PBS American Experience: My Lai Massacre

Sunday, February 17th, 2013

What drove a company of American soldiers — ordinary young men from around the country — to commit the worst atrocity in American military history? Were they “just following orders” as some later declared? Or, did they break under the pressure of a vicious war in which the line between enemy soldier and civilian had been intentionally blurred? AMERICAN EXPERIENCE focuses on the 1968 My Lai massacre, its subsequent cover-up, and the heroic efforts of the soldiers who broke ranks to try to halt the atrocities, and then bring them to light.

A Story of Ap Bac

Sunday, September 18th, 2011

These are the words that the 93rd Helicopter Company wrote in January ’63 after The Battle of Ap Bac. They were sung to the tune of “On Top Of Ol’ Smokey”.

LBJ Admits Murder of Diem

Sunday, September 18th, 2011

LBJs confession, straight from the horse’s mouth

LBJ Admits Murder of Diem

 

Vietnam War(s) Lecture

Saturday, December 11th, 2010

Here is my Vietnam War Lecture.

Lecture Outline:

  1. Imperial Roots
  2. On the Back of a Tiger
  3. The Arrogance of Power
  4. Opposition
  5. Peace with Honor
  6. Legacies

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