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Archive for the 'USH: Antebellum Movements' Category

18 Rules Of Behavior For Young Ladies In 1831

Monday, November 23rd, 2015

Rules of behavior for Young Ladies, partly extracted from this work and the most celebrated books on Ladies education.”

  • Avoid every thing masculine.
  • Be not too often seen in public.
  • Consult only your own relations.
  • Don’t even hear a double entendre.
  • Endeavor to write and speak grammatically.
  • Fondness for finery shows as bad a taste, as neatness and simplicity imply a good one.
  • Form no friendship with men.
  • Give your hand, when necessary, modestly.
  • If you talk in society, talk only about those things which you understand.
  • Know that a man of good sense will never marry but the pious, industrious and frugal.
  • Let not love begin on your part.
  • Make no great intimacies with any body.
  • Never be afraid of blushing.
  • Pride yourself in modesty.
  • Read no novels, but let your study be History, Geography, Biography and other instructive books.
  • Sympathise with the unfortunate
  • Trust no female acquaintance, i.e. make no confidant of any one.

Frederick Douglass: New Tea Party hero?!

Tuesday, August 13th, 2013

Last week, Frederick Douglass — who escaped slavery at 20 years old and whose words would help bring an end to the institution — was honored with a statue in the U.S. Capitol’s Emancipation Hall in Washington, D.C. In the 1960s and ’70s, far left activists like Eldridge Cleaver of the Black Panther Party and Angela Davis of Communist Party USA incorporated Douglass’ call to agitation in their various causes’ platforms. Yet in a fascinating turnaround, the brilliant abolitionist, writer and orator is developing a new – and perhaps, unexpected – political identity: Tea Party hero.

The recent rise in interest in Douglass by conservatives stems from their belief that his life epitomizes the self-reliance they champion, and his writings help provide justification for small government. It may be surprising to some that the fiery, black radical abolitionist of the 19th century, who once called Fourth of July celebrations “a thin veil to cover up crimes which would disgrace a nation of savages,” could be inspiring to a Tea Party patriot. Or that social conservatives could find common cause with the man who bitterly attacked America’s Christianity as “a lie.” But that is exactly what is happening.

…But as Republican Speaker John Boehner took the stage, leading the ceremony that pushes Frederick Douglass deeper into icon status, calling Douglass “one of the greatest Americans who ever lived,” it became less clear than ever who will win the battle to claim the legacy of Frederick Douglass.

American Civilization, Ralph Waldo Emerson

Thursday, February 28th, 2013

As the Civil War ground on, and the fate of the young nation hung in the balance, Ralph Waldo Emerson argued vehemently for a federal emancipation of the slaves. “Morality,” above all else, he asserted, “is the object of government.” He lauded President Lincoln for his principled moves in that direction.

Emserson: Self-Reliance

Sunday, November 11th, 2012

Self-Reliance is an essay written by American Transcendentalist philosopher and essayist, Ralph Waldo Emerson. It contains the most thorough statement of one of Emerson’s recurrent themes, the need for each individual to avoid conformity and false consistency, and follow his or her own instincts and ideas.

American Civilization, Emerson

Wednesday, December 7th, 2011

As the Civil War ground on, and the fate of the young nation hung in the balance, Ralph Waldo Emerson argued vehemently for a federal emancipation of the slaves. “Morality,” above all else, he asserted, “is the object of government.” He lauded President Lincoln for his principled moves in that direction.

Ralph Waldo Emerson, Circles (1841)

Sunday, November 13th, 2011

A transcendentalist masterpiece

Transcendentalism and Self-Reliance

Sunday, September 16th, 2007

The Works of Thoreau

The Works of Emerson

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The American Spirit in Literature, A Chronicle of Great Interpreters by Bliss Perry

Chapter V. The Knickerbockers

Chapter VI. The Transcendentalists

First Wave of Feminism in the US

Sunday, September 16th, 2007

DBQ on Cult of Domesticity Theme

Reading Questions on the First Wave of Feminism

Lesson Plan: First Wave

Age of Reform Lecture Notes

Sunday, September 16th, 2007

Lazar’s The Age of Reform Lecture Notes

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